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Dev-(b)log #3 – I finished the foundation!

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Hello friends! Here with another game update. Last time, I shared that I was working on a common foundation for my games. I finished this, and also took the opportunity to share some of my work. I made my first ever store page on Itch.io, and I submitted my tools to a game dev jam. You can see my entry here: https://sdggames.itch.io/modular-godot

The next two weeks are going to be fun: I am finally rebuilding Survive the Maze itself in Godot. I needed a solid foundation to build off of, and I now have that in place. If all goes according to plan, I’ll have (most of) the game as it exists in Unity rebuilt in Godot two weeks from now!

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dev-blog

Dev-(b)log #2 – Learning to make moddable games in Godot!

I would love to hear from you! Feel free to connect on Discord, check us out on Facebook, or subscribe so you never miss an update!

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Hey friends, it’s time for another update on my game dev adventure. I didn’t complete an entire game this week, but I did make something that’s still pretty cool (I think). It’s not a game this time, it’s a foundation that I can begin building off of in the next few weeks. For anyone who missed my first update, I recently completed a small game in the Godot engine. I decided that re-building my first game in this engine would actually be easier than fixing the bugs in Unity, so I’ve been on a two-week exploration through some of the more advanced concepts that I would need in order to make this change.

I finished two major things, and ended up with working demos for both. This is a screenshot of my mod loader system. This enables me to easily separate my game into multiple files, and makes it trivially easy for anyone else to contribute if they want. The demo project is just tic-tac-toe, but there are actually three different “skins” for that game that can be loaded from their own texture packs while the game is running. I will be using this tool extensively for Survive the Maze (and future projects), and I am incredibly pleased with how easy it was to implement in Godot. When I did the same in Unity, it required an external library containing around 10 thousand lines of code! This was built directly in to the engine, and I only had to write a couple hundred lines of code in two files. Super nice!

My second major win was the build system. Again, not a lot to look at, but I now have a system that will automatically build and test my games for me. No manual input required! Every single change I make will be tested, and if anything goes wrong, I’ll get a warning right away. This takes a ton of busy work out of my schedule and makes it way easier for me to focus on the real challenge: making great games. For anyone who is technically minded, this project is fully open-source, and you are definitely welcome to take a look around and let me know what you think! (Source code here) I will have a game (or at least some part of a game) built on top of this foundation next time. As always, thank you for being a part of this adventure!